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The Gardeners Weekend Podcast #4

sodshow, garden podcast

The Sodshow Garden Podcast – every Friday – in iTunes, www.sodshow.com all good podcast stores.

Get the podcast in MP3 or – As always you can rss the podcasts via iTunes or you subscribe to the blog and listen to them right here. Missed last weeks garden podcast?

Links from the podcast:

Garden advice on the podcast requiring linkage

In other news:

  • Thanks to @mushypea007 for my Peoples Republic Of Cork T-shirt
  • I love this bit of grafitti – thanks to @neilogorman and @stephenoleary
  • Thanks to @sharononeill and @fintanmurphy – I love this 3 story NCAD dinosaur made from recycled black plastic bags
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Fireblight

Two of the photographs above are of a collection of Sorbus trees that I had in my garden. They are now nothing but a pile of ashes. The sorbus you see are members of the rosaceae or rose family – the most of which are susceptible to a disease known as fireblight.

The first thing I noticed was that the leaves were shrivelled, dead and still clinging to the plant. [These photographs were taken the last week in January btw]. The buds were also dead but still held to the plant. When I checked inside they too were gone. Necrosis had set in and the stems were dying from the top down.

The cause of this is the bacteria Erwinia amylovora spread generally by the wind blowing, insects and rain splash. It is that simple.

The recommended method of control used to be to burn the plant and that was the route I chose. I guess old habits die hard 😉 But some books recommend the pruning of the plant well below where the fireblight can be found. I simply prefer the better safe than sorry route and the chances of it affecting some of the many other Sorbus sp. that are planted in my garden.

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Peach Leaf Curl

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As a by the way…. just because its called peach leaf curl, it doesn’t mean it only affects peach trees. It will affect most Prunus related species.

Anyhow, I don’t like this one at all. It simply looks so ugly…. caused by the fungus Taphrina deformans [the second part of the name says it all…], it is spread by rain and wind where it will hibernate in stem cracks, scars or wounds and there is literally damn all one can do about it.

The leaves become distorted and bubble up like big ugly red blisters. En mass, it is pretty ugly to look at and I kind of feel sorry for the plant…. especially when all of the leaves fall off.

Whilst chemical control via any sort of fungicide will do the job… in my own garden I prefer to let nature do what it must and maybe from a biological control point of way I may get involved…. But the leaves do grow back and hopefully the plant will come good. But isn’t that what gardening is all about…

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Coral Spot

coral-spot

coral spot

caused by the fungus Nectria cinnabarina these almost illuminous orange pustules [about 1mm diameter] take over the surface of the bark a little almost like having the measles…. [if you know what I mean] except for plants.

How they get there is quiet simple… affecting living or dead material the spores enter through damaged or necrotic wood and are usually spread by rain splash or/ and also from cutting/ pruning tools that haven’t been cleaned properly.

There is no real/ chemical control for this. But good garden hygiene is generally the best place to start. In it does infect, prune back to well below the last piece of infected material.

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A Fruit Tree Problem Shared is a Problem…

I have about 20 apple trees in my garden some in groups. Some seperate. One of them was looking particularly bad. I took a closer look….

There are two things that I spot immediately….

fruit-trees-pest and disease

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The scaring [left] can often be confused with the marks of apple sawfly…

….but these markings are actually a result of irregular water supply.

The fruit is quite small/ smaller than the fruits on other trees of same variety and some are out of shape.

The sudden availability of water causes the skins to crack.

This coincides with the time they where planted, the fact that they were containerised before and also that no mulching of any format was used.

The second is the wasps….

fruit-trees-pests ireland wasps

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the wasps…. [vespula spp.] are attracted to the fruits primarly damaged by birds… talk about lazy 😉

The suggested control by some is to find the wasps nest and destroy it.

I just can’t do that. Or you can cover the trusses with nylon/ muslin bags over the fruit before damage begins [?!] As long as its not in the house. There is nothing wrong with the tree. It’s simply the fruit that is gone from it for this year. What I will do it wait until autumn/ winterwhen all the fruit and leaves and wasps are gone and move the tree to a better spot.

A fruit tree problem shared is a problem solved….;) for next year!

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