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Another Grow Your Own Gardening Course

NEXT CLASS: tomorrow saturday April 17th 9.30am – 3.30pm

***if you are stuck for directions to Ballyboughal and then to my house you can contact me on [vodafone prefix and then add….]6594688

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I did the grow your own gardening course about 2/3 weeks ago now…. It wasn’t until I was out recently at an event and I was beig asked was I doing another as the wife would love to do it…. Then a neighbour popped by…. he’d love to too…. then online I got it…

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So the response from the last/ first class was good. The demand for a second one seems to be there…. that’s also good. It’s now simply a case of can I get the numbers to make a day of it….? That bit is up to you.

Who is the Garden Class for:

  • those who wish to be green but not a full time farmer.
  • those with an apartment balcony or you that simply just wish to grow a bit on a space about that size
  • For those who work 24/7 and watch tv but are willing to do a bit

Whats the day like:

  • real coffee & homemade buns on arrival @ 9.30am – with an intro chat amongst the group
  • then outdoors until around around 12.30
  • homemade lunchin the kitchen until around 1.15
  • back out until about 3pm and finish with a fresh cuppa/some homemade biccies and a chat.
  • to take place in Ballyboughal [it’s near Swords/ North Dublin ;) ]

Other info:

  • Places are limited to a maximum of 10 people.
  • Cost is €60 per person
  • I supply everything you need. You get to to bring it home with you.
  • laughing is encouraged
  • original post on the garden class here

Louise’s post really does summarise it very well

Wanna come along ?

  • Pop your name[s] in the comment box below.
  • email me info[at]doneganlandscaping[dot]com
  • phone me on [vodafone prefix and then] 6594688

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A Gardening Course …?

update 13th March 2010: One space has become available… pop your name down below, email or text me if your interested 🙂

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Over the last weeks I’ve been researching chatting with some friends about gardening and the usual how to bits of outdoor advice.

From those conversations came the suggestion that I should do a crash course of some format in ‘gardening‘.

I did teach horticulture and courses before. But this class request or what one should get at the end of it is to be slightly different as those urging me to do so are not horticulturalists – moreso they have a window ledge/ balcony or only wish to garden in small amounts and stints.

The outcome…? Either a one day course in gardening at my homestead or a 1.5 hour evening course in Dublin City Centre over a 3/4 week period. The majority in this case decided on a one day workshop.

To tailor make this session to the people and their wants I am proposing the following:

  • a one day crash course from 9.30am – 3.30pm
  • The first day/ date is Saturday March 20th
  • cost of materials only to be covered set at €60 per person
  • you take home what you make on the day
  • lunch will be included
  • to take place in Ballyboughal [it’s near Swords/ North Dublin 😉 ]
  • numbers will be limited to a maximum 8 people only

What we will achieve on the day:

  • gardening basics
  • how to grow your own from seed
  • growing plants on a budget
  • window ledge balcony gardening
  • looking after your plants
  • planting your planters
  • growing in a confined space
  • not enough hours in the day/ the 10 minute gardener
  • herb and salad kitchen gardening

this email just came in and sums it up nicely….

Basically: this is for the [wo]man, parent, adult, child who wants to do a bit of green living but not farming. Enough to have summer salads, fresh herbs, maybe even some fruit – at the same time logic enough that you’ll watch footie/ daytime tv and go out rather than hug trees. You’d like a bit of green, you need a place to start but without getting bamboozled – and let it grow from here….

The idea is simple enough and if numbers run over/ demand is great enough/someone approaches me with a suggestion I’ll do a second class/ consider those options then.

If you would like to do this class – or – have any queries or suggestions

  • pop your name down as a comment below
  • email me info[at]doneganlandscaping[dot]com
  • telephone me on [vodafone prefix – and then] 6594688

What do you think …..?

UPDATE:

If numbers fill up for the first group of 8…. assuming there is demand enough – I will do another day course. Put simply I’ll let the names spill over to a second group of 8 and we’ll call it from there. Crawling versus walking and all that cliché stuff 😉

Once again – your course/ class made better by your suggestions…. pop them in comment box below 🙂

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Lavender

The Lavandula [labiatae/ lamiaceae]

A genus of about 25 species, this fragrant beauty is an absolute must in any garden. Particularly high in nectar and therefore extremely attractive to bees, the answer from a domestic point of view is to be careful where exactly they are planted. A case of beneficial versus pest, possibly?

Often used in rockeries, as low hedges, in herb gardens, en mass planting or as a border plant… they really are [once again] a must have/ no garden should be without plant.

My main note of advice if choosing to plant lavenders is that they are cut back every season. The problem is that when they aren’t, they do go leggy, the flowers and foliage only appearing on the lasts couple of inches of the stem and the lower [soft] wood becomes almost like a moist cardboard. This leaves them very prone to a soft woody fragile rotting at the base which breaks then quite easily….  which is great for garden centres and people like me…. but not for you 😉

To cut yours back, use a good, clean sharp secateurs. Grab a good tuft of the plant and cut straight across. In a two year old plant for example this will remove the most recent seasons growth.

Of course this all depends on the variety and the varying external conditions. But as a general rule cutting a plant back to half height is no harm. When you’re done give it a good ruffle. Trim up the loose ends and clean around the base of the plant.

However you chose to do it…. even though it might look like a sheep shearer just gave you a bad haircut [at the time] but it is well worth it in the long run 🙂

If you are thinking of cropping the flowers for pot pourri, do so before they open fully.

Hard Landscaping & Small Spaces

pebble and paving...

The key to landscaping small spaces is that the final result, when complete, gives the feel of a brighter, airy & open space. It is to give the eye more than a ‘oh that’s nice’ and a walk on effect. It is to give, even in the smallest of spaces, a visual journey.

The second key is that it is contains the functional aspects and also with that in mind that aesthetically the finished garden style suits. In the case above a front garden with an allowance for an extra car parking space was to be given, without making the garden stand out for the wrong reason. It may not win awards – but it doesn’t look out of place for the wrong reason and also [very important] it fitted the clients budget.

We could have hard surfaced the entire front garden… but there are considerations however with regard to being a little greener; specifically with regard to paving and moreso with regard to front gardens. [This has recently been written about by Ros Drinkwater in the Sunday Business Post.] But, consideration to this really should be given anyway. The answer is possibly to do a mix of the the two and/ or to just go without the hardened surface. That aside – a concrete jungle, simply put, would have looked wrong.

Of course the alternate is a mix of the two. This allows for the drainage of water within that area, assuming that the preparations beneath allow for the dissipation of water through it. In the case above it also allowed that the dark pavings were given a little something to brighten up what could have become a very dark space. For that reason a bright gold pebble was used.

This does not mean of course that no one hardened surface can be given. it is simply a solution to low maintenance gardens and gardening; to small garden designs; to poor draining gardens and at the same time considering the environment. It is a possible alternate solution to hardened surfaces.

the meaning of life…

''who's the best uncle...''

''who's the best uncle...''

Todays post is a happy one. A very happy one.

Life [2 lives that is] is good.

The meaning of life, the true meaning, of that is, is being held in my arms.

Ladies and gentlemen may I introduce my two very newest nieces Molly [born 7lbs 2oz] and Lucy [born 5lbs 9oz] 31st October 2008. Mom, Dad and the twins are all doing very well.

I’m also a Godfather for the very first time.Isn’t it amazing how something so small can put it all in perspective.

Life is good… 🙂

A note on horticulture and whilst I’m, in the poetic mood… Tomorrow, November 15th in Trinity College Dublin [The Edmund Burke Lecture Theatre – Arts Block] from 2pm – 5pm Celebrate The Poetry of Plants featuring ‘renowned garden experts and authors’. The event is free – but – one must book in advance. To do so call [quickly] 01-8963174 or email lrhub@tcd.ie.

here come the girls...

here come the girls....