Posts

bloom 2008 [2] – the boat

pour l'amour de jeux - the boat garden

...

yesterday was not the most usual of days in my horticultural career! This 1957, 33 foot, 7 tonne boat is the model Royal Cruiser IV that will be used in Bloom 2008, the garden show extravaganza in the Phoenix Park this June Bank Holiday weekend.

It took 7 men, a 30 tonne specialist marine transporter and 6 hours to lift and move it 6 km. Working with me on the boat will be John Friel and his team who also who rebuilt the morris minor for last years garden.

we got a lot of strange looks when word went out that this was the boat for our show garden but.. maybe ‘show’ gardens should be just that….

...

Bloom 2008 – Pour L’amour de Jeux

This was the bio given to my show garden entry before it was built…

...

Without a main sponsor….. Peter Donegan’s design, titled ‘Pour L’amour de Jeux’ is a garden whose title and theme was chosen on the basis of a Designers desire to build and design ‘dream’ gardens because of a love of the game.

With modern pressures and taken for granted hectic lifestyles this garden is a micro-haven paradise designed and built with pure passion to show that dreamers do exist and that those dreams however illogic can become reality. If life is what you enjoy, then this garden is what you will love, our entry for Bloom 2008

When asked so many times throughout Bloom 2007, why one would design a show garden as was ‘No Rubber – Soul’; it seemed incomprehensible to some, yet to others put simply it was for ‘a love of the game’ the only reason why Peter Donegan and his team built such a garden. It seemed therefore quite an appropriate name for this garden.

A garden that is fully recycled or recyclable the main feature… comprises a 33ft 1957, pink, three story pleasure cruise boat named ‘Mo Chailín Cáitlín’. The garden is surrounded by water, a slightly raised recycled timber and lawn combined marina, and natures finest planting. The finshing touch is a hand sculpted piece by Patrick Campbell.

And so the question still remains… would you sponsor a show garden?

With thanks to:

free!! allium sativum

Also known as Garlic, these cloves [fresh] from China I bought in Superquinn!! Carbon footprint my tusche. The builders have destroyed my crop so I needed a fresh batch to grow from. I was surprised to discover their origin but these will be planted & not used for cooking.

To grow: Split the cloves. Plant 2″ down & 4″ apart. Plant now and lift at the end of summer when the leaves die off [as you would with most bulbs]. Let them dry and/ or replant. Free garlic!

...

corylus avellana ‘contorta’

corylus avellana contorta

corylus avellana contorta

I bought this plant around five years ago. But only recently has it started to show its true beauty. An aged, almost antique piece for the garden The ‘corkscrew hazel’ as it is commonly known produces tiny catkins which develop around the winter period.

I found it very difficult to get a really good photograph – but still, another little gem of intrigue for the garden. Valentines day is not so far off. If you’re not really one for the 10,000 euro bunch of chrysanthemums [including delivery..?], then this ones for you. Enjoy!

gentlemen? time to stand up & be counted

...

...

I took the DART into Dublin City recently. Been a while since I have. On the BUS home I took this picture and thought it would be a great poster to be put on all DART trains.

Reared with 4 sisters [& 3 brothers] I don’t wish to suggest a ‘National Peter Day’ of celebration but I feel compelled to say something.

I must have been one of very [very] few to stand and let a lady sit [age irrelevant] on a morning journey. The coach was full. One girl fainted a few seats down and still ended sat [slightly squashed] beside two ‘gentlemen’ who hunched hesitantly a little tighter on their seat whilst other people sat and read their newspaper. Two ladies did assist with water and such – agus bualadh bos – I applaud you.

More carriages – for sure. But it does not change the manner[ism]s of some who push and shove impolitely through their life. Is chivalry a characteristic of Irish history? Do we not perform random act of kindness at all? Or should we still blame Iarnród Éireann.

Maybe I just love going to work [incorrect by definition possibly hobby?!] and I’m slightly disillusioned believing it’s always great to see a smile….?