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The SodShow – 103.2 Dublin City Fm – 17 June 2011

The Sodshow Garden Podcast – every Friday – in iTunes, www.sodshow.com all good podcast stores.

The SodShow – 17 June 2011- Dublin City FM (mp3)

The SodShow – Fridays 3pm – 103.2 Dublin City Fm

Listen to The SodShow in MP3 – or – subscribe/ listen to the podcast in iTunes. Alternatively, subscribe to the blog and listen to them right here. Missed The SodShow June 10th 2011

Details on how to listen below….

With thanks to this weeks guest:

….and also as mentioned in the SodShow to the lovely people of Malones Cleaning 😉

Listen Later:

Listen Live:

  • Tune in: 103.2fm on your radio dial if you are in the Dublin area
  • Listen online: every Friday 3pm just click t9.ie/SodShow
  • or: visit www.dublincityfm.ie and click the listen button
  • also: use the hashtag #SodShow

Making Contact:

Thanks for listening 😉

The SodShow – 103.2 Dublin City Fm – 10 June 2011

The Sodshow Garden Podcast – every Friday – in iTunes, www.sodshow.com all good podcast stores.

Listen!

The SodShow – Fridays 3pm – 103.2 Dublin City Fm

Listen to The SodShow in MP3 – or – subscribe/ listen to the podcast in iTunes. Alternatively, subscribe to the blog and listen to them right here. Missed The SodShow June 3rd 2011

Details on how to listen below….

  • Peter Donegan and Brian Greene

With thanks to this weeks guest:

  • Gary Graham of Bord Bia and Bloom
  • Eamonn O’Malley of Lough Ennell Camp Site

Listen Later:

Listen Live:

  • Tune in: 103.2fm on your radio dial if you are in the Dublin area
  • Listen online: every Friday 3pm just click t9.ie/SodShow
  • or: visit www.dublincityfm.ie and click the listen button
  • also: use the hashtag #SodShow

Making Contact:

Thanks for listening 😉

NON hortulanus hortum ut quadam die

Your Garden Advice

I get asked a lot of garden related questions. Some, some may agree with, some there may just be a better way of doing it. I don’t mind that in so far as I know I will give my best at that time. I am also aware that some of my advice/ answers are starting to become patterns in that others are experiencing the same or similar problems, so this on the other hand is a little of a time saver for me. With that in mind and also that it may creat discussion I have decided to publish them. It won’t or may be a weekly thing. Just whenever there are enough to make it a post. I’ll even try and date them from now on.

These are just some that I could find to hand that I’ve replied to since Sunday.

Tree Advice:

I was just browsing your website and was admiring your work. I was interested in the trees you have planted in the image 63 of 140 in the image gallery. What type are they, betula utilis jacquemontii?
…… However, what safe distance from a 100mm solid block garden wall do you think is ok for the type of tree that you used.
I would have a distance of up to 900mm to the centre of the trunk from the wall.
I hope you don’t mind this random request for advice as a lot of advice on the internet is very conflicting.

To this I replied:

thanks for the compliment. The trees in question are indeed Betula utilis ‘Jacquemontii’. Very well spotted.
My opinion on the distance is a firm no, in short. It can be done and might work out fine. I can also understand the varying answers, but without even seeing the garden or foundations for the wall – its the distance and the eventual height the tree wants to grow…. it seems to me a mild case of keeping a tiger in a back garden – as versus a poodle. I know, a very bad analogy, but you get my point. More than that it is a very tasty choice in tree and one that comes with a price tag to match. If the question be would I invest my money, to put it into a space [distance] of that you have described – then the answer would be no.
Re the internet, you are 110% correct re the conflicting advice.
But then my grandmother did grow a lemon tree from a pip in what I can only describe as the windiest courtyard walled in on all four sides on dublins southside. According to the rule books, that should not happen. 🙂
No problem re the random request.

I got this response:

Thank you very much for your prompt response. Says a lot about how you view your business.
Anyhow. I will take your good advice, although the wall is new and I witnessed the foundations being poured. They are over 300mm wide and deep. Would be planting between granite slabs and I know the roots of these trees can be shallow too.
Pity, as they are a very tasty tree, as you said.

I replied:

speaking as Peter… I’d love to see you not take my advice simply just to see a beaut like that planted.
Some will say its fine. Some wont. But, if I am being asked in writing [*coughs so it sound all very official] then I’d have to say no. And in writing I’d be correct.
I do agree though, shame.
On a seperate note: doing a garden recentlty and a clients son asked why I followed Arsenal. In a similar light, absolutely stunning, beautiful to watch but…. 🙂
Have a great day and sorry for the fact that you aren’t going ahead.

Plant I.D.

Hi Peter apparently a very old flower!! But we don’t know the name! Any idea? Cheers

I replied:

looks like aquilegia, i’m reckoning the Aquilegia buergeriana 🙂 http://bit.ly/muRmMe

Tree Advice:

last december i got a pine tree, i coulnt plant it due to snow and frozen ground, the pine was in the same pot as i bought her in till march gone,  i noticed a couple of the branches turning brown, and i figured its about time i plant the pine, so i did, and well watered it and gave the pine some tree food, and watered her every day, the last few weeks she is turning completely brown except for the inner middle, have u any suggestions as to what i can, can she be saved.

I replied

is there any chance of a few photgraphs. also i wonder if this recent spell of warm weather had brought on some buds. my own weeping ash has only started producing hers in the last week or so. Been a tough 18 months for the poor fellows.

Thanks for your reply, I have attached some photos, you will be able to see that the inside is staying green, which gives me hope, have you any suggestions.

[note: I cannot locate the images but suffice to say it was entirely brown]

I replied:

I dont know if I’ve replied to this – but you are still in my inbox. this is the second time – would you believe to answer almost the exact same question. And sorry for the delay but the sun shine was keeping me quite busy 🙂
So here’s what I said and the exact same story applies to you too…..
In short, the tree may come back and there may as it seems be signs of life within. The key would be to remove all dead wood – or wood that is brown the entire way through. If you are unsure simply cut back until you hit a point of where the wood will not snap as versus bend and also there should be some signs of sap or green within. The tree may look disastrous after as a result but – the tree shouldn’t be trying to put energy into what is dead wood.
The reality is that the trees have simply had a double bad beating of the minus celcius elements over the last 18 months and some have simply suffered badly or just passed on. Would I fertilise ? No.
This is, based on the images the best advice I can give having I suppose not really seen the tree in person. that said, based on what you’ve told me I’m not far off the mark.

————- —————————————

If any more come in and are answered between now and Saturday night. I’ll update the post and simply pop them in here.

Growing Seeds… Without Compost

I was asked about my thoughts on growing seeds and what compost type one should buy last week.

I have written many times on why I prefer were possible to sow my seeds, in particular when growing my own food stuffs as compost-less as possible. Whilst it is great to see the growing at home movement very much en vogue… I hope the big [logic] picture isn’t left behind.

This video summises my thoughts on the logic of this posts title quite well.

 

Fingal Libraries Schools Gardening Talks

I mentioned last week that I was doing some gardening talks with Fingal County Council Libraries. The classses were for 4 primary school classes and took place over a two day period.

To deviate mildly, because of where I live, the mobile library is there should I need it and to that it has been a while since I was in a library building. I was so impressed. Blown away, is most probably a more apt description.

If you thought libraries are dull, boring and dreary places reticent of ’80’s Ireland, you are miles nee kilometres off the mark. Childrens areas, wifi, bright and bustling – with areas of quiet – is what they are; all complete with modern meeting rooms – which is were my talks were held.

I centred my talks, in [extremely] short, around a plant starting as a seed, maturing into a plant in order to produce a flower which in turn produces a seed, basically it’s life cycle, only for it to start all over again. Examples and samples of my apples trees in bud, actual apples, bananas, carrots, onions, onion plants and sets [i threw in a leek and a flowerless daffodil for the craic], as well as potato seeds and potatoes, to name but a few.

To the staff in all I extend a massive thank you for being so amazing and so very kind. Also to Siobhan Walshe who was my point of contact for the week and such a pleasure to chat with.

As a by the way, Rush library, [pictured above] formerly an old church building if for nothing else is well worth a visit for sake of the architecture, the interior and the way in which modern technology has interacted with it. The compliment can be extended, albeit in a varying light, to Baldoyle library semi wrapped in glass and overlooking the waters leading to Irelands eye; Malahide library get my applause for their front garden which I love dearly and Balbriggan library I actually got lost in it.

More details on fingal libraries and the garden classes/ talks contact:

Siobhan Walshe
Development & PR Department
Fingal County Libraries
County Hall
Swords
01 8905532
www.fingalcoco.ie/Library

More information on garden talks & demonstrations:

You can also contact me in the following ways: