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The SodShow – Dublin Garden Radio – Sept 2nd 2011

The Sodshow Garden Podcast – every Friday – in iTunes, www.sodshow.com all good podcast stores.

The SodShow – Dublin Garden Radio Podcast – Sept 2nd 2011 (mp3)

The SodShow – Fridays 3pm Live – Dublin City Fm

peter donegan brian greene

With thanks to this weeks guest:

John Farrell of Atfar Construction starts off with an intro to a new weekly segment session talking all things hard landscaping.

And of course I will be talking all of the thing you can be doing in your garden this September.

Listen to The SodShow Live @ 3pm:

  • Tune in: 103.2fm on your radio dial if you are in the Dublin area
  • Listen live online: every Friday 3pm via TuneIn.com – on your phone or desktop

Listen Later:

Making Contact:

Building Your Own Bar-B-Q

bbq hand made

I bought this ‘barbequick‘ bbq last year. Quick? hmmmm… €20. In December. Bargain. Left it in the shed.

my very first barbeque...

When the sun came out I built it. Did it end up looking like the image above…? not on your nelly… 😉 But for good reason….

If you do fancy building your own barbeque – here’s how.

Stone type:

  • i tried to get the same brick sizes as per the instructions – but – free bricks are much nicer
  • i wanted a ‘looks like its been there for a while…’ kinda finish – it’s also the greatest excuse if you’re not the best brick layer in the world
  • don’t use concrete blocks unless you are going to plaster the walls

Location:

  • decide where you want it. This is built from stone. Solid stuff. It hasn’t got wheels. So be darned sure it is exactly where you want it.
  • Keep it well away from walls… smoke? black? and more important timber fences… fire?
  • not right beside the patio – smoke/ guests eyes; flames & grannys new hair do

How I built mine:

  • I picked my spot.
  • Took the measurements from the instructions and layed a foundation about 4″ deep – to finish just below ground level. Left it for a few weeks day or three…

Materials:

  • 300 no. brick
  • 2 no. bags cement
  • 1 no. bag of gravel
  • 3 no. bags of sand
  • washing up liquid [substitute for mortisiser – bonds the cement better]
  • some paving slabs for the base – for you to stand on

Tools:

  • spirit level – a good long one
  • a block splitter ‘or’ a good bolster chizel and a mallet
  • a trowel
  • a wheel barrow to mix cement in

Conundrums:

  • I measured the foundation from the instructions but that was based on ‘their’ brick sizes. Mine were smaller & I needed a lot more than they suggested.
  • The clips to support the grill are ‘only’ to suit that size of block. They obviously wouldn’t fit ‘my’ barbeque.
  • I also wanted an extra, adjoining counter to the side for plates and food so I had a bit more to do.

Don’t Forget:

  • To stick a few long screws into the cement while laying to hang your implements on
  • Measure twice and cut once rule

My thoughts:

It will take about 2 days to complete. And there is nothing more rewarding than sitting back with a cup of coffee looking at a wall that you built. Sincerely. Especially if you are a man…. 😆

If one was to pay to get it built….? In my opinion, it would be cheaper to go and buy one. To approximate the costs briefly; if the bricks costs €1 each; multiplied by 300 bricks – One is already at €300 before it gets built….?

That said, I didn’t want a gas barbeque. I wanted one that I could say in years to come… that ‘I remember building that…’ I also have the ability to barter eggs for materials and so apart from my time – this really didn’t cost me whole lot.

too much rain – water is precious

water is precious

water is precious

Apart from this being a really cool picture, the message is also superbly important.

What you do [?] and *your* role with *your* environment is of major importance. The taptips website is good and did make me think if I was doing enough. I already have my waterbutts, but can I do more….? The climate change website suggests so…. ?

The uk assembly wrote an amazing document [click here] titled: crazy paving – the environmental importance of londons front gardens. From that here is the opening paragraph.

if an area of greenspace in London the size of 22 hyde parks were to be concreted over there would, quite rightly, be a huge public outcry. But when the lost greenspace in question is made up of front gardens rather than parkland, we have let this happen with barely a murmor. Our research suggest that around two thirds of Londons front gardens are now either partially or wholely covered in an assortment, paving, bricks, concrete and other hard surfacing. Much of this is to create off-street parking space, but the convenience and the desire to create minimalist gardens fuelled by endless TV makeover shows have also played a role.

too mch rain in ireland

too much rain in ireland

Fair point really. And here is where our role starts. Energy saving light bulbs to your hearts content… but until the landscaping industry in it’s entirety start – right at the very start – with *our* homes, then little will give.

This was one of the pictures on Ricks website and although rainfall was unusually higher.. we can do our [not so difficult] bit to help.

From planting a tree, to pebble as a driveway instead of concrete; pebble instead of paving and using recycled timber instead of imported ‘decking’. The list i’m sure is endless, although quite logic and simple. The question is I suppose ‘what one change will you make?’