my green odds & ends

I done a few varying lists in the past from top posts to things to do and from Valentines to things to make you happy. Over the last while I have collated a new set and I think it’s about time?

first up courtesy Jessi Mannerings blogcrumbs blog

case of beer seed tray

case of beer seed tray

re cycle charge your phone – with pedal and power – love it 😆

national tree week – March 1st -7th – go on!

build your own breadoven [call the guy!] via irish alotments

fire!!! these water features rock – literally

via cheapeats.ie – green grannies

use a plastic bag & get 5 years in jail – via eco childs play

ecobaby – compostable –  nappies made from wood pulp? or just use a towel and a big pin like my mammy used to 😆

guarantee a green ireland – buy as local as possible, buy irish & give back the packaging…. and finally…..

this is absolutely amazing… watch it very carefully

plants require passports…?

don't hide them in there...?

don't hide them in there...?

it is so very true… One may wonder why but it is in fact very necessary.

So that I don’t bore you to absolute tears – I’m gonna break this post up into two/ three parts. But I’ll try and keep it short and to the point. The first will give you a general gist; there’ll be some links to government articles if you wish to delve a little further and then more info after if you really get into the groove 😆

Back to it and to quote the Department of agriculture [in brief]

The main objective of the European Community (EC) plant health controls is to prevent the movement of quarantine harmful organisms into and throughout the EC.

Not all plants do require however. And this can make it mildly confusing. A full list of plants that do require passports is available here. And a plant passport should appear on the plants tag as per this example:

EC plant passport/IRL/DAFF/ 1234/ wk32 qty1 plant ZP b2
Cotoneaster ‘Hybridus Pendulus’

So what relevance does this have to you the consumer? The point I make is to be careful. Sometimes a too good to be true offer is simply that. It can also be just as good an absolute bargain. But this is legislation. And although it maybe a plant – the legislation [in this case] is there for very good reason.

For example in cases of fireblight – [fireblight wickipedia] the mandatory action is the burning/ destruction and/ or quarantine of all related stock from a nursey and/ or a particular regio/ a certain radius of all plant material within that vacinity. But one could literally lose an entire stock holding in one very quick swoop. What are the options? If you do suspect or detect a case you should contact your department of agriculture.

...but not your plants

...but not your plants

Back to the the plant passport… A plant passport in one simple tag therefore should contain the following information

  • EC plant passport
  • Indication of EC Member State code
  • Indication of responsible official body or its distinguishing code
  • Registration number
  • Individual serial or batch number
  • Botanical name
  • Quantity
  • The distinctive marking ‘ZP’ for the territorial validity of the plant passport, and where appropriate, the name of the protected zone(s) for which the product is qualified
  • The distinctive marking ‘RP’ in case of replacement of a plant passport and, where appropriate, the code of the originally registered producer or importer
  • Where appropriate, the name of the country of origin or consignor country, for third country products

That wasn’t so bad… 🙂

irish blog awards ’09

damien mulley

damien mulley

The brainchild of the genius that is Damen Mulley, the day was Saturday 21st February, the venue was the Cork International Airport Hotel, it was of course the Irish Blog Awards ’09.

Peter Donegan Landscaping weblog had been nominated and loglisted but we didn’t make the finals. That said, my intention for blogging was never to receive an award. And although I wouldn’t mind the accolade 😆 when I read the finalist listings, those who did make the final cut and the eventual winners – I realise I have such a long way to go and so much to learn from those who are so good at what they do. A sincere bulaidh bós to all it was an honour to be in your company.

After that Huge praise and applause to all of the sponsors; To all of the bloggers I met and spoke with [and didn’t]: legends. A mention to the lads Darragh and team and John who did the videos; to Rick O’Shea our host; A note of applause to Eolai whos art decorated the walls of the hotel and once again to all who made the night so enjoyable. – [If I have left anyone out I apologise sincerely – let me know and I’ll edit the post].

The list of winners are all here. Do take a look. They are so very much worthwhile reading and deserved of the acclaim. Well done once again to all.

national tree week

Blog posting #300 🙂  March 1st – 7th 2009 is National Tree Week. It’s a cool week. There’s loads of tree events on – literally all over the country. There is no excuse not to get involved. I have some posts on trees, trees, trees and trees here to get you in the groove. That said if you don’t want to plant a tree yourself – you can always sponsor a tree – and it will be planted for you.

The trees don’t have to be huge – they even don’t have to be expensive – but they are important and if we did plant one tree each [that’s over 4 million!!] can you imagine how beautiful the country would look. If where you live is ‘not as green as it should be’, if you want to give something a little not so expensive and don’t want to look like a cheap-skate or if you haven’t seen a bird in your garden since you moved in…. You could… and you really could, make a difference.

Go on plant a tree. And give it a hug after 😆 but of course!

herbaceous plants

herbaceous adj designating plants that are soft stemmed rather than woody
herbaceous border n a flower bed that contains perennials rather than annuals
[source collins paperback dictionary]

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In ordinary lingo, a herbaceous plant is one that although is more like a shrub rather than a bedding plant; it will come up year after year [ie. it is a perennial/ completes its life cycle over several seasons] and it does not need to be replaced as your ‘summer bedding plants would. [if you don’t understand still, thats ok – leave a comment and i’ll go into more detail]

A garden without herbaceous plants is generally quite dull. People tend to have their reasons as to why they should not have them. The main one is that they usually look like a lump of pulp come their off season. That said they do look spectacular when in flower.

The problem in my opinion is that times have changed. On one hand market seems to suggest a lot more ‘low maintenance’ style planting is in order – on the other – people are going back to living ‘the good life’ and the days of plant division and sharing/ swapping with your neighbours may not be so far away again. Thank God!

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The reason in my opinion, I even turned off them for a little, is because the ‘ye olde’ days of gardening was and still is considered for those only of stately home type and sized grounds – it is also the audience to whom most of our writers still preach. The ‘I’m-excited-about-this-plant-you’ll-never-be-able-to-pronounce-the-name-of-but-i’m-ecstatic-about-it-so-so-should-you-be’ type. This I still find can generally come across as extremely boring – and generally speaking it is. No offence. But the fact that those who write so botanically speaking eloquently are still employed; the fact that they speak only of a fashion that appeals to a select demograph – is not the fault of the plant. I have four sisters and three brothers and not one of get turned on by the mention of ligustrum ovalifolium aurea variegata [variegated golden privot by the way].So I dont mention it – like that.

I generally compare this to a boring english teacher, in the case of this analagy, poetry. It is not poetry’s fault. It is not the authors fault. I love poetry. But – sometimes the person giving the sermon is more the destructor than the pupil who is not paying attention. It is why I always do not assume that everyone has the same passion or qualifications as I do. But also that they may wish to – even a little. It is also to eliminate any arrogance that may be sounding.

That aside ‘herbaceous considered’ plants are cool. I like to plant them in clusters and also to hide them behind other clusters of evergreen so that when they do die down, something else is hiding the gap. It may require a good planting plan but – no ‘garden’ is complete without them.

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