rubbish

rubbish

This isn’t a book review! This is a lot more serious, at least where I come from! I’m hesitant, slightly, to give my opinion here but with some decisions made by certain state authorities in Ireland, I begin to wonder their logic. Before I write any further, I do live near enough [5-8 miles away] but not near enough to affected directly by the facility. I shall proceed. Yes the waste must go somewhere. Yes until commercial and domestic waste producers [both us] must get to grips with the full reality of  ‘our’ situation. Even then a waste facility will be necessary; but maybe not a super-one, maybe not so controversial and maybe logic will be applied to the decision in its entirety.

So what’s a garden designer got a bee in his bonnet over this for? Should not the question be for this Island – how do we survive without one? and then track back? I simply believe there is another option and ‘we’ should not have to fight to keep Ireland as it should be every time a decision we dont need is made. Controversial?

These facts here however are those as written by Nicola Cooke of The Sunday Business Post, September 23rd 2007 in her article Lusk Groups Protest against ‘superdump’.

Fruit and vegetable growers and processors in Lusk Co. Dublin fear that their multi-million-euro industry will be threatened by a decision to grant a waste licence for a super dump in the area.The Environmental Protection Authority decided last Friday to grant a licence to Fingal County Council to develop a landfill facility and public recycling plant at Nevitt, Lusk. The Superdump would have a maximum annual intake of 500,000 tonnes of non-hazardous waste.The EPA imposed more than 130 conditions relating to the environmental management, operation, control and monitoring of the proposed facility. It said it was “satisfied [that] emissions from the landfill will not adversely affect human health or the environment and will meet all relevant national and EU standards.”But a number of local groups are opposed to the development and are seeking an oral hearing and a judicial review of the decision.Country Crest, one of the largest horticultural businesses in Lusk, has a €28 million annual turnover, employs 104 people and is one of Tesco’s main Irish suppliers.Managing director Michael Hoey said he was very concerned about the business’s future. “We are less than two miles from the landfill and are on the same stream of aquifers as that site,” he said.“Leachate [toxic waste water] could contaminate the well water we use to wash our fruit and veg that is processed, so this landfill is a major worry for us. I know rubbish has to go somewhere, but the current site is just not suitable. I had an auditor over from Tesco on Friday asking for water analysis to show that there were no metals in the water.”“If there is any problems with our water supply – and that of other producers – in the future, the supermarkets won’t look at us.”